tunafishprincess:

zwergis-spilledink:

justsomecynic:

I’m a very lazy person. I know my characters well, but every time I try to fill out a proper character sheet, I either get distracted or simply never finish them.

SO!

I made this! A silly, simple character sheet in which you only have to check boxes to get to know your dear puppet character. Use to your heart’s content, and if you’re going to repost, please credit! Enjoy~

PDF/Printable version on Google Drive

Now that’s a character sheet I wanna try out!

I lik dis

Tips from a YA Editor by Anne Regan: Crafting a Query Letter

harmonyinkpress:

What’s a query letter?

  • A short
    (single page) introduction of you and your book to a publisher or agent
  • Use professional business letter format, font,
    and language
  • Do your research about the publisher or agent so
    you can:
  • Personalize the letter to a specific person (for
    example, the acquisitions editor)
  • Show how your book meets their submission
    criteria

Start with the most important information first

  • A “hook” – one sentence that captures the
    essence of your story and makes them want more
  • To save
    his world, a hobbit must destroy a powerful magic ring.
  • A farm boy
    joins the rebellion against an evil galactic empire.

State how your story fits what they publish or
represent.

  • I enjoy
    your fantasy novels and would appreciate your considering my novel
    Hobbit
    Wars.
  • Always include the title, genre, and word count.
  • Be sure these meet the submission guidelines for
    your target publisher or agent.

Include a brief synopsis of the story

  • No more than one or two short paragraphs –
    ideally no more than 150 words
  • Focus on your main characters, their goals, and
    the obstacles they face to achieve them
  • Don’t overdisclose – leave the editor or agent
    wanting to read more

Wrap it up

  • Include a sentence or two about yourself
  • Include any writing credits, awards, or special
    background that influences your story
  • Thank the editor or agent for their time and
    consideration
  • Based on the submission guidelines, include the
    manuscript or excerpt or let them know it is available on request

What I learned from writing (and finishing) my first book:

adorhauer:

image

-It doesn’t matter if you miss a day (or a week). Looking back I can’t even remember what days I did or didn’t write, and honestly? There were months where I didn’t touch the story. All I know is that I finished the damn thing, and that’s what matters.

-Have a routine. On days that I did write, I sat with my laptop and some hot tea next to a bright window and banged out 5,000 words before noon (due to the fear that if I didn’t do it first thing I wouldn’t do it at all). Figure out the place, time, and things that make you want to write, and use them.

-Make a schedule. I didn’t worry about writing every day because I blocked out a time frame of what needed to be finished when. Give yourself some leeway, but mark important dates on a calendar.

-Find what works for you. Don’t freak out if what you’ve written goes against “the cardinal rules” of writing. Your biggest objective is figuring out how to best tell your story.

-Fly by the seat of your pants. You can write complete and utter BS and still turn it into a good story that makes sense. Get rid of the idea that it has to sound perfect from draft one, and start taking pride in the fact that you wrote a crappy first draft at all.

-Embrace embarrassment. You’re going to have to read some of your story to people, and you’re going to have to listen to other people reading it out loud. If it gets to that point, try to reflect on how amazing it is that you’ve made it this far. Not every writer does.

-Don’t listen to your fears. What scares you now may not affect you in twelve months. In the beginning I told myself I’d put it out in the universe and let it exist without really acknowledging it (whatever gets you going, 2017 me). Now I have an author’s blog and am actively promoting giveaways and book release dates. Go figure.

-Know your audience. Don’t write something you think will please someone else- write for yourself, and you’re guaranteed to make one person happy (who hasn’t heard that before?). You are the audience. Know yourself.

-Stay healthy. If writing is getting in the way of your health- whether it be making you sleep less, skip meals, or spend long periods of time away from loved ones- it’s time to step back. Some of the best parts of my book came to me when I was out experiencing life, not sitting at a computer.

-Arm yourself against negativity. There are going to be people who will tell you what you do isn’t worthwhile, and that you’re wasting your time- until your book is published, then all of a sudden they expect a free copy. Surround yourself with supporters, and know who to ignore.

Scents

nikkxb:

Currently Untitled
Pairing: Nathan/Anna
Rating: Teen
Summary:

Anna’s never been to New Orleans. What better way to spend her first night than at a lounge enjoying good food, good drinks, good music, and unexpected good company?

Life Swap AU for AU Yeah August.
Author’s Note: This is an AU based off the original story I’ve been working on. I’m no where close to publishing it (or even finishing the first draft), but I decided on a whim that this could be fun and I had a blast. 

If you want information: Nathan is my werewolf and you can read his current introduction here. (And here is his first introduction in my head, should you be interested.) Anna is a human, though writing this drabble helped me finalize a few things about her backstory that were previously hazy. You can find everything pertaining to this work under this tag and it’s also what I was working on when I participated in Camp Nano in April.

I think that’s all I have posted, so here you go!


She loved new cities. They held new smells, new mysteries, new creatures. In the last four of her adventures, she’d met creatures she’d only heard of and here, in the heart of New Orleans, she was hoping to do the same.

The air was musky, smelling of wet earth and marsh even though she was in the middle of the French Quarter, sitting outside a cafe and enjoying the sounds of a band as they played. The cafe — it really was a lounge with the smoky haze outside and the menu boasting beautifully mixed cocktails, but Anna had never been able to adapt the new language against what she grew up with, so because this lounge didn’t offer the company of young, single women with fluctuating morals, it was a cafe.

Funny how she could lose herself in thought when the world was standing right there for her perusal.

Keep reading

I read books and articles on writing and they all say never do this, never do that. Then I pick up a book from a best selling author and what do I find? All the things I was told never like a prologue and back story. Is it because they’ve made a name for themselves and can do anything they want? These aspects must enhance the story or they would have been cut.

nicholene:

I want to add in something I learned from music theory that goes along well with writing theory.

You always start with the rules. They’re guidelines to help you build a foundation to stand on as you’re learning the craft. Once you have those rules in place, you start to learn more rules and more rules until finally, you realize the music you love breaks most of those rules.

The thing about theory is learning which rules to break, when you can break them, and why. In early music history and theory, seventh and second intervals were never used because they didn’t sound good to the human ear at that time. Learning that rule establishes a strong sense of dissonance. When you understand that dissonance, you can ‘break’ that rule by using those intervals to create unresolved tension. It’s why the Jaws theme is so captivating – because that minor second interval (an inverted seventh) invokes anticipation and suspense as the audience waits to hear the resolution.

Books and articles are going to teach a classical foundation of writing and it is in your best interest to learn that, to adopt those rules and figure out how to abide by them. Once you understand those rules, you have a better grasp of writing and can use those rules to manipulate your work in ways that invoke strong reactions from your readers. 

Rather than focusing on what rules are broken in published books, try and figure how why they were broken and what impact they have on the story. 

@loegi2308

theliteraryarchitect:

Why Just About Every Published Book in the World Does 57 Things That Just About Every Book About Writing Tells You Not to Do

#1 The author has made a name for themselves and can do anything they want.

Publishers aren’t as discerning about literary quality if they’ve got a writer who they know is going to sell books. Whereas a newbie might get rejected for having 200 pages of backstory and 16 prologues, an established writer with a sales record can get away with it.

#2 Mainstream readers are not as discerning as people who write books about writing would have you believe.

Books about writing are often written by learned literary folk, whose advice is then (sometimes mindlessly) repeated by everyone else. On the other hand, bestselling novels are often written, and read, by regular folk who don’t give a crap about high literary art. It’s kind of like the difference between what they teach in film school and the reality of blockbuster movies.

#3 Really good writers can do anything they want.

The most hackneyed, clichéd, classically do-not-ever-do-this stuff can be made into pure stylistic genius in the right hands. Two chapters of nothing but dialogue? A book written from the point of view of a dog? Excessive footnotes? Run-on sentences? It’s all been done, and been done brilliantly, by really, really good writers.

This can be frustrating for new writers, who want to be able to follow a clear set of rules in order to be successful. That’s why so many of my posts have caveats like “in general,” “as a rule of thumb,” and “most often.” Because the honest answer to every single question I get is It depends. Which is why I really recommend that writers try to connect with a mentor, editor, or teacher who can read your actual work and give customized feedback. This is rarely cheap. But one or two exchanges with a professional can be worth months or years of reading writing advice books with all their generalized Dos and Don’ts.

Which leads me to…

#4 Writing is art. There are no rules in art.

This truth is what makes writing great, and also what makes writing difficult. It’s also why writing books that claim to have all the “answers” sell so damn well. I’m not saying those books aren’t full of mostly true, super helpful guidelines. Back before I had access to any other kind of help and lacked experience, I learned a lot of the basics by reading. So keep reading them! But pay attention to the overstatements, the exceptions, the reality of what excites readers, and, perhaps most importantly, the reality of what excites you. Is a writing book telling you not to do something that sets your soul alight? FUCK THAT BOOK. Do whatever you want. Have fun. Figure out how to be one of the ones who gets away with it.

This inspirational message brought to you by the end of a long day at the end of a longer week. May it rekindle your spirit as it has mine ❤

Yes, you are perfectly right, I guess. An advanced Writer is allowed to break the rules because he knows what he’s doing. A beginner will never succeed that way: you have to know the basics, before you are able to play with them.

And when the beginner, as all beginners do, point to all the rules broken and question why other people can do this when they’re told not to, this is why.

I’m not advocating for someone to break the rules right off the bat; my post is intended to show the end result of learning the rules.

You have to show a writer the benefit of the journey to entice her to make it.

I read books and articles on writing and they all say never do this, never do that. Then I pick up a book from a best selling author and what do I find? All the things I was told never like a prologue and back story. Is it because they’ve made a name for themselves and can do anything they want? These aspects must enhance the story or they would have been cut.

theliteraryarchitect:

Why Just About Every Published Book in the World Does 57 Things That Just About Every Book About Writing Tells You Not to Do

#1 The author has made a name for themselves and can do anything they want.

Publishers aren’t as discerning about literary quality if they’ve got a writer who they know is going to sell books. Whereas a newbie might get rejected for having 200 pages of backstory and 16 prologues, an established writer with a sales record can get away with it.

#2 Mainstream readers are not as discerning as people who write books about writing would have you believe.

Books about writing are often written by learned literary folk, whose advice is then (sometimes mindlessly) repeated by everyone else. On the other hand, bestselling novels are often written, and read, by regular folk who don’t give a crap about high literary art. It’s kind of like the difference between what they teach in film school and the reality of blockbuster movies.

#3 Really good writers can do anything they want.

The most hackneyed, clichéd, classically do-not-ever-do-this stuff can be made into pure stylistic genius in the right hands. Two chapters of nothing but dialogue? A book written from the point of view of a dog? Excessive footnotes? Run-on sentences? It’s all been done, and been done brilliantly, by really, really good writers.

This can be frustrating for new writers, who want to be able to follow a clear set of rules in order to be successful. That’s why so many of my posts have caveats like “in general,” “as a rule of thumb,” and “most often.” Because the honest answer to every single question I get is It depends. Which is why I really recommend that writers try to connect with a mentor, editor, or teacher who can read your actual work and give customized feedback. This is rarely cheap. But one or two exchanges with a professional can be worth months or years of reading writing advice books with all their generalized Dos and Don’ts.

Which leads me to…

#4 Writing is art. There are no rules in art.

This truth is what makes writing great, and also what makes writing difficult. It’s also why writing books that claim to have all the “answers” sell so damn well. I’m not saying those books aren’t full of mostly true, super helpful guidelines. Back before I had access to any other kind of help and lacked experience, I learned a lot of the basics by reading. So keep reading them! But pay attention to the overstatements, the exceptions, the reality of what excites readers, and, perhaps most importantly, the reality of what excites you. Is a writing book telling you not to do something that sets your soul alight? FUCK THAT BOOK. Do whatever you want. Have fun. Figure out how to be one of the ones who gets away with it.

This inspirational message brought to you by the end of a long day at the end of a longer week. May it rekindle your spirit as it has mine ❤

I want to add in something I learned from music theory that goes along well with writing theory.

You always start with the rules. They’re guidelines to help you build a foundation to stand on as you’re learning the craft. Once you have those rules in place, you start to learn more rules and more rules until finally, you realize the music you love breaks most of those rules.

The thing about theory is learning which rules to break, when you can break them, and why. In early music history and theory, seventh and second intervals were never used because they didn’t sound good to the human ear at that time. Learning that rule establishes a strong sense of dissonance. When you understand that dissonance, you can ‘break’ that rule by using those intervals to create unresolved tension. It’s why the Jaws theme is so captivating – because that minor second interval (an inverted seventh) invokes anticipation and suspense as the audience waits to hear the resolution.

Books and articles are going to teach a classical foundation of writing and it is in your best interest to learn that, to adopt those rules and figure out how to abide by them. Once you understand those rules, you have a better grasp of writing and can use those rules to manipulate your work in ways that invoke strong reactions from your readers. 

Rather than focusing on what rules are broken in published books, try and figure how why they were broken and what impact they have on the story. 

theliteraryarchitect:

Aka “Kill your darlings.” I don’t agree with this 100%, but if you’re having an impossible time getting a story into shape, check to see if there’s a sentence or passage that you’re completely attached to and are resistant to editing or deleting. Then get rid of it, and see what happens.

Also, having recently published a few short stories I can report that the sentences I was most blindly attached to were the ones that the editor wanted to strike out before printing. I hated the idea at first, but after listening to their logic, I had to admit they were right: The passage wasn’t doing anything for the story, I was just in love with it… and with my own perceived brilliance.

Just something to think about. Curious to hear other folks’ thoughts on this one!

lilly-white:

m-l-rio:

If you are an aspiring author, you need to read this thread.

“Peeps keep asking if you should then save your ‘best’ idea for later and just write whatever for your debut. NO. NO NO NO. You *always* write your best idea. You give it everything you have. Leave nothing on the mat. You are an endless well of ‘best ideas’. Trust that “